The Odeon Humber returns

The Odeon Humber returns

  After a delayed start or two, it appears the former Odeon Humber is finally set to re-open today, courtesy of the same folks who revived the Kingsway a few years ago. The Humber, located at 2442 Bloor St. West at Jane, was twinned in 1975 and closed in 2003 while under the control of Cineplex Odeon. But over sixty years ago,  on January 27, 1949, the 1200 seat theatre  opened with a flourish. In…

Read More

Allen’s Bloor Theatre

Allen’s Bloor Theatre

For over twenty-five years, Toronto concert-goers and Annex residents have known the building at 529 Bloor St. West as Lee’s Palace. But nearly a century ago, the Allen’s Bloor Theatre was one of the most luxurious suburban movie houses Toronto had to offer. The immaculately detailed 782 seat theatre held its premiere screening on March 10, 1919 with Cecil B. De Mille’s Don’t Change Your Wife, featuring Gloria Swanson. It was the first theatre to…

Read More

The Metro Theatre’s red hot opening night

The Metro Theatre’s red hot opening night

  At Bloor and Manning, a giant poster advertising Emmanuelle adorns the facade of the Metro, Toronto’s only surviving legitimate adult movie theatre. But long before it began showing porn in the 1970s, it served as a neighbourhood theatre for over three decades. Despite the PG-rated nature of the cinema’s opening night (April 7, 1939) double-bill, Delinquent Parents and Looking for Trouble, things got a little heated during the second showing of the programme when…

Read More

Classics From The Vault presents Scarface (1932)

On Thursday, July 29, 7PM, my new screening series at the Fox Theatre continues with one of my favourite films from Hollywood’s Pre-Code era, Howard Hawks’ Scarface (1932). Considered one of the greatest early gangster films, Paul Muni’s performance in Scarface ranks alongside James Cagney in The Public Enemy and Edward G. Robinson in Little Caesar, and would influence the genre for generations to come, from The Godfather to The Sopranos. Scarface chronicles Tony Camonte’s…

Read More

Lee’s Palace Shows its True Colours

by Eric Veillette Yesterday, Torontoist reported that the colourful amoeba and monster-laden mural which has adorned the facade of Lee’s Palace for over twenty years was taken down, to be replaced with a new creation by original artist Runt. Annex residents may feel it looks temporarily naked without it, but it gives us a better view of the building, which once housed a movie theatre. Designed by architect C. Howard Crane in 1919, it opened…

Read More